May 14, 2020

Knowledge Nuggets Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion

May 14, 2020

Knowledge Nuggets Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion

Business Strategy, Ashton Bishop, Knowledge Nuggets

To sway someone to your point of view takes skill. The same can be said when it comes to selling a product. The power of persuasion is a potent tool and should be honed to a fine point.

In this week’s Knowledge Nuggets we are taking a look at Dr. Robert B. Cialdini’s masterwork, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. We will learn the power of persuasion and integrate the six heuristics of persuasion into marketing strategies.

Insight: Organisations that utilise the six heuristics of persuasion will be able to market their products more effectively.

Data: Across three studies with over 3.5 million people, it was found that psychologically tailored advertising, resulted in 40% more clicks and 50% more online purchases than mismatched or impersonal messages. (www.scientificamerican.com)

What’s the step change:  To integrate the six heuristics of persuasion into your marketing strategies, download Knowledge Nuggets. Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion.

Screen Shot 2020-05-14 at 8.03.46 am

Knowledge Nuggets 12_1

 

Six Heuristics of Persuasion:

According to Dr. Cialdini, there are six principles that rule the science of persuasion. Let’s examine each principle and its key characteristics. 

1. Reciprocity

The principle of reciprocity is the obligation to give back to others in the form of behaviour, gift or service they have received. In most cultures, social norms compel people to return a favour or repay a debt. And if you refuse to do so, you will lose a degree of social standing.

2. Consistency

When it comes to persuading people, consistency is a key factor. If you are consistent in your public commitments, you are showing people that you can be counted on. 

If you are considered trustworthy, there is a likelihood of you persuading them to your point of view. The consistency principle works because a majority of people crave social approval.

3. Social Validity

We are social animals. Although we try to be more individualistic at times, it is a part of our genetic makeup to follow the group.

It’s how we evolved as a species. We learned through trial and error, that those who follow the group survive and those who stray get eaten. This is why people often look to the behaviour of others to dictate their own. 

4. Liking

According to Dr. Cialdini, people prefer to agree with people that they like. There are three factors that influence likeability. 

The first factor is similarity. We tend to trust people we have similarities with. The second factor is that we tend to like people who give us compliments. The third factor is that we like people who share the same goals as us.

5. Authority

We are social animals. Although we try to be more individualistic at times, it is a part of our genetic makeup to follow the group.

It’s how we evolved as a species. We learned through trial and error, that those who follow the group survive and those who stray get eaten. This is why people often look to the behaviour of others to dictate their own. 

6. Scarcity Principle

People will always want what they can’t have. So if you want your product or idea to be well-received, present it as something rare. This will pique people’s interests and make them want to attain it.

Summary:

The six heuristics of persuasion are highly effective. However, this does not mean that they are foolproof. When you try to persuade someone, you should take their cultural background into account.

Remember that not everyone shares the same norms and mindset as you. So the effects can differ. Ultimately, persuasion is a powerful tool. It can be used in both ethical and unethical ways. It is your responsibility to use it with honesty and with forethought. 


Download our Knowledge Nugget on Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion

      Categories

      More

      To get to know you better, please fill in the field below.